Tag Archives: Traffic

When Cities Won’t Protect Bike Lanes, ‘Human Bollards’ Step Up

​ New York City’s signature green-painted bike lanes have spread nearly as fast as Duane Reades and Chase Banks, it seems. But many new lanes are unprotected by physical barriers, which help make safe rides for drivers and cyclists alike. So on a Tuesday morning in late August, local bike lovers used their bodies to protest—and protect—a particularly exposed stretch. Read more... Read more

Road Diets Make for Skinnier Streets that are Safer for Pedestrians

A decade ago, when Riverside Avenue in Jacksonville, Florida was widened to six lanes, there wasn’t much reason for anyone to walk across it. But in recent years, that stretch of Riverside has seen a construction boomlet. Now the Downtown Investment Authority is exploring a concept called a road diet that would result in fewer lanes for automobiles, making it easier for people on foot and bicycle to cross the the street. Read more... Read more

Traffic Impacts of Bicycle Facilities

Traffic Impacts of Bicycle Facilities is a research project funded by the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) and the Local Road Research Board (LRRB) to inform the design of multimodal transportation facilities. The project involved a review of design guidelines for bicycle facilities, observation of bicycle-vehicle interactions at nine roadways in Minnesota with different types of bicycle facilities, analysis of results, and description of implications for design. Learn more... Read more

How Not to Create Traffic Jams, Pollution and Urban Sprawl

​The more spread out and car-oriented a city, as a result of enormous car parks, the less appealing walking and cycling become. Besides, if you know you can park free wherever you go, why not drive? The ever-growing supply of free parking in America is one reason why investments in public transport have coaxed so few people out of cars. Read more... Read more

How Urban Transportation And Planning Unlock The Future Of Accessibility

​Sitting in traffic is a waste of drivers’ time and money, and it contributes to air pollution. So what’s to be done? Start designing cities for people, not cars. Urban planners can ensure accessibility through mixed-use development, or by connecting neighborhoods through a rich provision of non-motorized mobility options, like bike paths or high-quality public transportation. Read more... Read more

How Engineering Standards for Cars Endanger People Crossing the Street

​At the Landmark Interchange by Fenway Park in Boston, people trying to walk across the street sometimes have to wait as long as two minutes for a signal. And that, says Northeastern University Civil Engineering Professor Peter Furth, is dangerous. Two minutes is an unreasonably long time to ask someone to wait — especially in one of the nation’s most walkable cities. Faced with that delay, says Furth, people will try their luck crossing against the light. To compound the... Read more
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