Tag Archives: Stormwater Management

The Greening of Minnesota’s Urban Rooftops

​ Vegetative roofs have become more common as developers and building owners go green to save money and reduce their environmental footprints. For communities, green roofs can reduce stormwater runoff into sewer systems. For building owners, they can cut energy consumption by acting as a buffer against the sun, slicing air conditioning costs and roof maintenance. Read more... Read more

St. Louis Tears Down Abandoned Homes to Absorb Rainfall

​About 1,000 of St. Louis’ delinquent properties are expected to face the wrecking ball to create more green space to absorb rainfall. The move will help the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District comply with a court order to cut sewer overflows. Doing so means the sewer district must reduce rooftops and pavement in areas where rain overwhelms its system. Read more... Read more

GIWiz: Green Infrastructure At Your Fingertips

EPA’s Green Infrastructure Wizard (GIWiz) is an interactive web application that connects communities to a wealth of tools and resources in order to help them better manage stormwater runoff. In just a few clicks of a mouse, users can draw from EPA’s scientific research on green infrastructure and stormwater management to identify resources and match solutions to the specific needs of their local environment. Learn more... Read more

Rain as a Resource: St. Paul Innovates Shared, Sustainable Stormwater Management

New infrastructure systems in St. Paul use rain as a resource instead of letting stormwater enter area lakes and the Mississippi River, along with all of the pollutants that water collects. This new method of managing stormwater is called “shared, stacked green infrastructure.” That means the system does more than one thing on a site (say, irrigating plants and/or trees), to provide additional community services or amenities beyond just managing rain runoff. Read more... Read more

Changes in Landscapes and Buildings Could Help Fight Flooding

A curbside garden filled with native plants that attract and feed bees and butterflies. Roofs covered with plants that slow the flow of water. Barrels and tanks that collect the rain pouring off rooftops. Water quality experts believe that these types of landscape and design features, known as low-impact development, or LID, are both an important part of solving San Antonio’s problems with environmentally degraded waterways and flooding, particularly as the city continues to grow. Read more... Read more

Philadelphia Considers Exempting Gardens From Stormwater Fees

Philadelphia, like many cities, is under an EPA consent decree to eliminate combined sewer overflows. All residential properties are charged an additional stormwater management fee on their water bill, and non-residential properties pay a fee based on square footage of impervious surface. Community gardens, by their nature, tend not to have much impervious square footage, but they pay the minimum lot charge anyway. Mayor Jim Kenney signed a city council ordinance that would allow for a discount of up to... Read more
« Older Entries