Tag Archives: Stormwater Management

Two Cities Will Get Chance to Raise Money for Green Infrastructure

​Last fall, the DC Water and Sewer Authority issued an Environmental Impact Bond or EIB. Investors put up $25 million to construct green infrastructure designed to mimic natural processes. Two more cities will soon issue EIBs for infrastructure projects. Which two cities exactly will be determined in a competition announced by Neighborly, a company with a platform that makes it easy for the public to invest directly in municipal bonds. Read more... Read more

Detroit in 2067: Where do we go from here?

​​Trying to predict the state of Detroit 50 years from now is an idealistic pursuit to be sure, but keen observers from different fields of study contend the framework for the Motor City’s future is being installed now. Several futurists and urban planners envision Detroit making better use of open space, embracing its own recipe for mobility and building on a foundation being laid now by private and public entities. Read more... Read more

Framework and Tools for Quantifying Green Infrastructure Co-Benefits and Linking with Triple Bottom Line Analysis

The Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WE&RF) is seeking proposals to list and quantify the multiple benefits of implementing green infrastructure (GI) using cost-benefit type of analysis to cover economic, environmental, and social aspects for stormwater management and relevant programs. The objective of this effort is to develop a framework and tool for quantifying the multiple benefits of implementing GI and evaluating the economic, environmental/ecological, and social values of GI. Applications due June 19. Learn more and apply... Read more

As Green Infrastructure Pioneers, Philadelphia is Primed for Workforce Development

​Philadelphia has embarked on a multi-generational, multi-billion-dollar program that is not only addressing stormwater runoff and sewer overflows, but providing new job opportunities, better preparing the city for climate change, and creating neighborhoods that are greener, more vibrant places for our residents to live, learn, work and play. Read more... Read more

The Greening of Minnesota’s Urban Rooftops

​ Vegetative roofs have become more common as developers and building owners go green to save money and reduce their environmental footprints. For communities, green roofs can reduce stormwater runoff into sewer systems. For building owners, they can cut energy consumption by acting as a buffer against the sun, slicing air conditioning costs and roof maintenance. Read more... Read more

St. Louis Tears Down Abandoned Homes to Absorb Rainfall

​About 1,000 of St. Louis’ delinquent properties are expected to face the wrecking ball to create more green space to absorb rainfall. The move will help the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District comply with a court order to cut sewer overflows. Doing so means the sewer district must reduce rooftops and pavement in areas where rain overwhelms its system. Read more... Read more
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