Tag Archives: Revitalization

Main Street Now Conference

Join your fellow commercial district revitalization professionals for three exciting days of education sessions, mobile tours, special events, and plenty of opportunities for exploring all the great things Pittsburgh and the surrounding area has to offer. Attendees will explore how Main Streets can position themselves at the forefront of the new economy, dive into the critical intersection of health and place, discover how commercial districts can be drivers of equity and inclusion, and more. Learn more and register... Read more

Cornerstone: Understanding Neighborhood Change

​Why do some neighborhoods become “hot,” some stay much the same, and others decline? Factors such as location, housing stock, schools, community organizations and more can affect a neighborhood’s trajectory. Understanding why the same activities seem to make a difference in one area, and little or no difference – or even have a negative impact — in another is critical to developing an effective revitalization strategy. Alan Mallach, a senior fellow with the Center for Community Progress, will discuss his... Read more

The Great “Innovation” Rebrand of West Baltimore

On a blighted section of Baltimore’s North Avenue not far from the Maryland Institute College of Art, a public housing project, unoccupied for almost two years, is currently being torn down. Built in the 1970s, the 27-building complex that came to be known as Murder Mall is being cleared away to make room for a $100 million mixed-use development project that will break ground in one to two years from now. When complete, it will include between 300 and 500... Read more

Housing Market Revival is Key to Detroit’s Economic Recovery

A healthy housing market builds current residents’ wealth, attracts new residents, stabilizes neighborhoods, and generates revenue for local government. Although Detroit’s housing market has been plagued by weak demand, an oversupply of aging and dilapidated housing stock, and a lack of sufficient income and access to capital for potential homebuyers, emerging trends and innovative practices are moving the city toward greater economic recovery. Read more... Read more

Detroit’s El Moore Building Gets An Eco-Friendly Rehab

​ The El Moore was built in 1898 as eight luxury apartments—unusual for a neighborhood then dominated by large single-family houses. After falling into disrepair, local preservationists wanted to create a place that would contribute to the community. So they came up with the idea of a combination of apartments and hotel rooms. The dual setup creates an interactive community experience, where visitors could meet residents and spend time in a Detroit neighborhood. Read more... Read more

The Limits of Café Urbanism

Locally owned restaurants are responsible for a large amount of the resurgence in comeback neighborhoods. They are a fundamental source of the increased sales and property tax revenue, and scholars have argued that café urbanism can be an engine for the broader success of the surrounding metropolitan area. But what if, over the next few years, it starts to peter out? Read more... Read more

Philadelphia Has a New Plan for Its 43,000 Vacant Lots

The Philadelphia Land Bank’s new strategic plan is an attempt at balance. The document shows the potential transformation of vacant or underused lots into housing of all kinds, mixed-use development, community gardens and side yards. It sets a target of returning nearly 2,000 properties to productive use over the next five years, with more than 1,200 of those expected to become homes, 650 of which are intended to be affordable for low-income Philadelphians. Read more... Read more
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