Tag Archives: Public Transportation

Webinar: Building an Equitable Transportation System with Shared Mobility

(Credit: Shared Use Mobility Center)
Shared mobility holds enormous potential to help meet the mobility needs for underserved populations that are too often left behind in the planning process. Join the Shared-Use Mobility Center for a free webinar to learn how to use shared mobility to address these important mobility issues. Presenters will discuss emerging best practices that cities are using to help address transportation equity needs in their communities. The webinar will also cover ways that transportation and policy experts can use SUMC’s Shared... Read more

22nd National Conference on Rural Public and Intercity Bus Transportation

national-conference-on-rural-and-city-transportation
At this conference, workshops and panels address innovations in one of three areas: innovation in the customer experience, innovation in organizational and/or program sustainability, or innovation in economic development and community sustainability. Of particular interest for this conference within each of the routes are topics on mobility management, rural/community transportation, connecting communities through intercity bus service, national parks, tribal services, demographic, cultural and socio-economic changes in rural communities, and veterans’ transportation. October 2-5 in Asheville, North Carolina. Learn more... Read more

De Blasio Plans Ferry to Serve Gentrifying Brooklyn, Queens

Astoria Park, in Astoria, Queens, a neighborhood that the new ferry will serve (Credit: Marley White)
Potential economic benefits of New York Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plans to create a ferry service linking Manhattan with a string of fast-growing communities across the East River outweigh impacts from noise, engine exhaust and traffic. Still, the system’s success hinges on its ability to attract millions of passengers with a $6.60-per-ride subsidy that would become more expensive to taxpayers if it serves fewer riders than the mayor predicts. Read more... Read more

If You Build It, Will They Have to Leave?

Light rail station at Othello Park in Seattle (Credit: Karen Ducey / Business Journal)
A team of researchers at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs has created an interactive mapping tool to help community leaders better understand the effects of new light-rail and subway projects and related developments — especially on low-income communities. Researchers view the project as a resource to help communities and policymakers identify the pressures associated with development and figure out how to take more effective action to ensure that new construction isn’t always accompanied by current residents being priced... Read more

A Year After a Radical Route Rethink, Houston’s Transit Ridership Is Up

METRO bus in Houston
Houston’s overnight bus network transformation in August 2015 was a transportation planner’s dream. The old hub-and-spoke system that had for decades funneled commuters downtown was straightened into a grid that cross-cuts the city, with fewer redundancies, more frequent service, and all-day, all-week service on heavily used lines. Almost every route was changed, with increasing ridership rather than service area as the guiding priority. Now, the Kinder Institute for Urban Research reports that Metro saw ridership on its local bus and... Read more

Shared Mobility and the Transformation of Public Transit

(Credit: San Diego Magazine)
This new report from the Transportation Research Board (TRB) examines the relationship between public transportation and shared modes, such as bikesharing, carsharing, microtransit and ridesourcing services. The objective of this research was to examine potential issues of new modes and explore opportunities and challenges for public transportation as they relate to technology-enabled mobility services, including suggesting ways that transit can learn from, build upon, and interface with these new modes. Learn more... Read more

The Fourth Virtue of Public Transit

(Credit: Ibagli via Wikimedia Commons)
​For most Americans, public transit basically has three virtues. It’s environmentally friendly, it’s cheap and it’s good for economic development. These three virtues are broadly understood—or at least, understood as standard arguments in favor of transit, even if not everyone finds them convincing. But as city centers are changed by both demographic shifts and technological innovation, it seems increasingly necessary to add a fourth virtue to the broad public debate over urban transportation: Public transit is space-efficient. Read more... Read more
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