Tag Archives: Density

Dense Urbanism is Great for Downtowns. But What About Suburbs?

Post-war America has largely been built around cars. Many existing cities permanently scarred themselves with new urban freeways. Though the status quo of big, bland, car-centric subdivisions retains enormous inertia, there is now a real counter-movement of urbanists trying to reclaim the virtues of pre-car towns and cities: scale, character, and walkability. Read more... Read more

Making Cities More Dense Always Sparks Resistance. Here’s How to Overcome It.

Urban density, done well, has all kinds of benefits. But it means telling the residents of an area that a bunch more people are moving in. And that always generates resistance, sentiment that has taken on the name NIMBY [Not In My Backyard]. Urbanist Brent Toderian, who has worked with numerous cities on densification projects, explains how he thinks about, and deals with, NIMBYs Read more... Read more

Growing Up: New Guidelines Promote Child-Friendly Density

​ The City of Toronto is creating new planning guidelines to ensure that high-density communities better meet the needs of children. Growing Up: Planning for Children in New Vertical Communities initiative provides new guidelines to promote more youth-friendly development. The newly released draft plan lays out the City’s priorities, with policies addressing urban well-being at three scales: the neighborhood, the building, and the unit. Read more... Read more

California Won’t Meet Its Climate Change Goals Without a Lot More Housing Density In Its Cities

​To meet the bold new climate change goals put in place last year, California will work to put millions of electric cars on the road, revolutionize its dairy industry and generate half of all power from solar panels and other renewable sources. But those efforts will come up short, warn state regulators, without dramatic changes to how Californians live and travel. Getting people out of their cars in favor of walking, cycling or riding mass transit will require the development... Read more

Can Spending Money on Trails and Density Grow Tech Jobs in St. Louis County?

The amenities and density that often help attract a highly educated workforce are somewhat lacking in a suburb developed when planners thought of little more than accommodating cars. Now, area leaders are planning trails and connections to food and entertainment, attributes many believe are necessary to continue attracting the top-notch scientific talent that drives biotech investment. Read more... Read more

Density Is at the Center of San Diego Climate Fight

San Diego environmentalists and urbanists are sounding the alarm. They say if the city doesn’t take steps to increase density in its inner-core neighborhoods it won’t be on track to accomplish its climate goals. The city says the advocates are too focused on land use and are ignoring the many other climate mitigation strategies it has in play. Read more... Read more

The New American Suburb: Diverse, Dense, and Booming

American suburbs are far from a static set of cookie-cutter housing developments. But a forthcoming new report, Demographic Strategies for Real Estate, suggests that this archetypical part of the American landscape is in for some massive changes over the next decade that will reshape planning, land-use, and the real estate market. Read more... Read more

Downtown as a Template for Miami’s Future

People in Miami love their cars, and for good reason: it’s not exactly one of the most walkable large cities in the U.S. And yet there are signs Miami is trading in its decades of auto-centric urban design for a denser, more pedestrian-friendly model. Downtown Miami is leading the charge into that walkable future. Read more... Read more

9 Lessons in the Beautification of Livable Cities from Charleston’s Former Mayor

Charleston, South Carolina’s answer to gentrification has been truly investing in affordable housing; that’s the short version of former Mayor Joseph Riley’s message to open the 24th annual Congress for the New Urbanism in Detroit. When Riley first took office, affordable housing in Charleston was obligatory and ugly. Riley’s philosophy: “If people can see it, then it has to be beautiful.” It’s a fundamental principle of social justice and one that guided the mayor’s 40-year tenure. Here are a few... Read more
« Older Entries