Tag Archives: Cars

How Autonomous Cars and Buses Will Change Urban Planning

​Are U.S. cities ready for driverless cars? When you consider that city planning has largely revolved around roadway infrastructure, the urban form as we know it will be radically transformed by self-driving technology. It’s important to consider the effect autonomous cars will have in order to fully gauge how the American city might brace itself over the next few decades. Read more... Read more

How Your Suburb Can Make You Thinner

If people can’t be cajoled to walk for its own sake, is there another way to get them moving? In recent years, planners and policymakers have begun to consider this: If suburbs are the problem, maybe suburbs can be re-imagined as the solution. People drive because their neighborhoods encourage it—and sometimes even leave them with no choice. What, then, if their neighborhoods were built to foster walking? With the right layout and development, the notion goes, our suburban towns and... Read more

Denver’s Commuter Corridors Are No Longer Just for Cars

As the City of Denver grapples with a surging population, intensifying traffic at all hours of the day and high demand for driving alternatives, public works officials increasingly are dividing up precious pavement, ending the decades of supremacy enjoyed by cars. Transportation planners say making Broadway more accessible to cyclists and transit is a way to increase its travel capacity and create better, more reliable alternatives for people who don’t drive to get around. Read more... Read more

How Not to Create Traffic Jams, Pollution and Urban Sprawl

​The more spread out and car-oriented a city, as a result of enormous car parks, the less appealing walking and cycling become. Besides, if you know you can park free wherever you go, why not drive? The ever-growing supply of free parking in America is one reason why investments in public transport have coaxed so few people out of cars. Read more... Read more

How Urban Transportation And Planning Unlock The Future Of Accessibility

​Sitting in traffic is a waste of drivers’ time and money, and it contributes to air pollution. So what’s to be done? Start designing cities for people, not cars. Urban planners can ensure accessibility through mixed-use development, or by connecting neighborhoods through a rich provision of non-motorized mobility options, like bike paths or high-quality public transportation. Read more... Read more

In Baltimore, Combining Bikes and Buses to Reconnect a Car-Lite City

​ A lot is about to change about transportation in Baltimore. In July, its sprawling, spindly bus system will get a so-called “haircut,” refocusing bus service around neighborhoods with higher ridership in this city where only two in three households owns a car. Starting in July, the time between bus arrivals will drop from 30-40 minutes to 10 minutes or less. Baltimore is also hoping to spend the next three years installing a low-stress biking network in six neighborhoods. Read... Read more

How Engineering Standards for Cars Endanger People Crossing the Street

​At the Landmark Interchange by Fenway Park in Boston, people trying to walk across the street sometimes have to wait as long as two minutes for a signal. And that, says Northeastern University Civil Engineering Professor Peter Furth, is dangerous. Two minutes is an unreasonably long time to ask someone to wait — especially in one of the nation’s most walkable cities. Faced with that delay, says Furth, people will try their luck crossing against the light. To compound the... Read more
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