Design Lansing: A Plan for the Future

​Design Lansing uses smart growth principles in its comprehensive plan that represents a new direction for the city, blending the strengths of the community with time-tested development patterns and new thinking. These concepts help improve sustainability, livability, and quality of life, including placemaking, green infrastructure, green development, and complete streets. Read more... Read more

Transit Innovations Needed to Connect Milwaukee Area Workers to Jobs

​The distance between the end of fixed-route bus service and the doors of large employers in the Milwaukee area is a major barrier to filling job vacancies. Known as the “last mile,” this disconnect between workplaces and the reach of public transportation for people without cars is as much of a problem in the city as it is in suburban communities. A new study by the Public Policy Forum recommends several options for eliminating the gap. Read more... Read more

Where Are the Nation’s Young Homebuyers Now? Pittsburgh, DC and Des Moines

​ Millennials in Pittsburgh, Washington D.C., and Des Moines are pursuing home ownership more than their counterparts in any of the nation’s 100 largest cities, according to a new study by LendingTree, the online loan marketplace. These young homebuyers are at the forefront of a growing nationwide trend of young buyers returning to the housing market. Read more... Read more

Hudson Yards: Innovative Financing Is Developing NYC’s Last Frontier

​Less than a mile west of Times Square along the shore of the Hudson River, workers are transforming Manhattan’s last frontier of developable land into millions of square feet of office, residential, and commercial space — one of the largest private real estate projects in U.S. history. At Hudson Yards, a massive, 37,000-ton platform will cover dozens of acres of live train tracks. The development, 45 square blocks of rail yard and industrial land between 30th to 42nd streets, will... Read more

Autonomous Vehicles: Hype and Potential

  Every new transportation technology affects the geography of communities and the structure of people’s lives. Autonomous vehicles (AVs) are one such technology. Just as the freeway system or the streetcar network shaped past cities and lifestyles, AVs will remake the metropolis once again. The question is how and with what unintended consequences? As with most technology, the answer turns on how the technology is used. Read more... Read more

D.C. Wants Employers to Pay Workers Not to Drive to Work

​D.C. officials and transit advocates are pursuing a shift in the way employers offer commuting benefits to encourage more biking, walking and transit over solo driving. A D.C. Council proposal would require employers who provide their employees with free or subsidized parking to give them the choice to cash out. With that option, workers would be more likely to ditch the car for a more sustainable mode of travel to work, officials say. Read more... Read more

The Train Line That Brought the Twin Cities Back Together

Less than three years since the Green Line opened, it has smashed ridership forecasts by almost 50 percent and helped to revitalize stretches of University Avenue, an aging, formerly car-dominated thoroughfare, as new businesses open near the stations and longtime businesses attract new customers. Transit-dependent low-income and working-class people are commuting to jobs across the metro area, while new housing for professionals is springing up in an old industrial area. And the Twin Cities aren’t done. Read more... Read more

Parking Spots Are Still Hot Property, But Ride-Sharing Is Changing That

​Thanks to the rise of on-demand ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft, the need to have a car (and a parking space) is lessening even for daily commuters. A recent study found that in 7 of 11 cities including New York, Washington D.C., and San Francisco, commuting to and from work using UberPool was cheaper than owning and driving a car. Read more... Read more
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