3 Success Stories Show How to Apply Road Safety Through Public Health Plans

​The idea of linking Vision Zero and public health came about because according to US standards if 30,000 people died each year from a curable disease, that would be considered a public health crisis. However, when there are the same number of deaths in avoidable traffic accidents, they’re treated very differently. Because of this, the network states that an “urgent health framing and a public response” are necessary for these deaths to be dealt with accordingly. Read more... Read more

Metropolitan Pedestrian and Bicycle Planning Handbook

The purpose of this Federal Highway Administration handbook is to provide Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) with practical information and examples as they consider pedestrian and bicycle transportation in their regional planning activities. Based on research including interviews with seven MPOs and critical evaluations of plans and associated documents from 11 other MPOs, this handbook covers integration of pedestrian and bicycle information into the metropolitan transportation planning process. Read more... Read more

Philadelphia Lays Out Data-Driven Plan for Eliminating Traffic Deaths

​Philadelphia’s new Vision Zero Action Plan prioritizes data collection in its quest to end traffic related deaths by 2030. The action plan takes aim to help fix unsafe streets and calls for more protected bike lanes and red light cameras. But its scope is wider, proposing changes in the areas of licensing and inspection that will affect how the police and public health departments conduct business. Read more... Read more

In Baltimore, Combining Bikes and Buses to Reconnect a Car-Lite City

​ A lot is about to change about transportation in Baltimore. In July, its sprawling, spindly bus system will get a so-called “haircut,” refocusing bus service around neighborhoods with higher ridership in this city where only two in three households owns a car. Starting in July, the time between bus arrivals will drop from 30-40 minutes to 10 minutes or less. Baltimore is also hoping to spend the next three years installing a low-stress biking network in six neighborhoods. Read... Read more

California Won’t Meet Its Climate Change Goals Without a Lot More Housing Density In Its Cities

​To meet the bold new climate change goals put in place last year, California will work to put millions of electric cars on the road, revolutionize its dairy industry and generate half of all power from solar panels and other renewable sources. But those efforts will come up short, warn state regulators, without dramatic changes to how Californians live and travel. Getting people out of their cars in favor of walking, cycling or riding mass transit will require the development... Read more

How Engineering Standards for Cars Endanger People Crossing the Street

​At the Landmark Interchange by Fenway Park in Boston, people trying to walk across the street sometimes have to wait as long as two minutes for a signal. And that, says Northeastern University Civil Engineering Professor Peter Furth, is dangerous. Two minutes is an unreasonably long time to ask someone to wait — especially in one of the nation’s most walkable cities. Faced with that delay, says Furth, people will try their luck crossing against the light. To compound the... Read more
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