The Walking College: A Human Capacity Development Strategy for Growing the National Walking Movement

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America Walks’ Walking College program is a successful interactive, online educational program for walkable community advocates. Over the past two years, America Walks has worked with advocates across the US to build skills, learn from experts and each other, and, ultimately, strengthen their capacity to create walkable communities. The Walking College curriculum and training process outlined in this report is a look at how America Walks is working to support, grow and improve this national walking movement. Read report... Read more

Small Town and Rural Multimodal Networks

This sidewalk in Altamont, NY (pop. 1609) features a brick treatment, pedestrian scale lighting, street banners and colorful plantings. (Credit: Alta Planning + Design / CC-BY-SA)
This FHWA document is intended to be a resource for transportation practitioners in small towns and rural communities. It applies existing national design guidelines in a rural setting and highlights small town and rural case studies. It addresses challenges specific to rural areas, recognizes how many rural roadways are operating today, and focuses on opportunities to make incremental improvements despite the geographic, fiscal, and other challenges that many rural communities face. Read report... Read more

Are You a Millennial? Fort Myers Wants You to Move Downtown

Downtown Fort Myers, also known as The River District (Andrew West / The News-Press)
Fort Myers officials are willing to rewrite the law books to make shopping, dining and living around downtown more attractive to millennials. Higher density around downtown means more buildings for urban housing, retail and coffee shops. The city’s goal seems simple: diversify the economy, create a walkable environment and establish a hub of activity. Then, theoretically, millennials will come. Read more... Read more

The Hidden Inequality Of America’s Street Design

Credit: silveryyn / Flickr
Urban design has a long history of perpetuating racial and economic inequality, and the burden of bad streets is still being disproportionately borne by underserved populations. According to “Dangerous by Design 2016,” a new report from Smart Growth America, pedestrians in the United States have a higher risk of being killed by cars if they’re people of color, aged 65 or older, uninsured, or from a low-income household. Read more... Read more

Dangerous by Design 2016

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On average, 13 people were struck and killed by a car while walking every day in 2014. This report from Smart Growth America takes a closer look at this alarming epidemic. The report examines the metro areas that are the most dangerous for people walking and includes a racial and income-based examination of the people who are most at risk, and for the first time also ranks states by their danger to pedestrians. Read report... Read more

Walkable, Urban Neighborhoods Are Transforming How We Live in NJ

An artist rendering shows The Green at Bloomfield, a 140-unit mixed-use, apartment building that opened in fall 2016 (Courtesy of BNE Real Estate)
While the demand for walkable, urban neighborhoods grows, the skyrocketing rents of New York City and New Jersey’s “Gold Coast” locales are prohibitive for many renters. Even those who have spent years residing in these markets face a difficult proposition when major life events — such as marriage, the birth of a child, a desire to be closer to family — conflict with their ability to remain in their costly urban climes. New Jersey — with an extensive network commuter... Read more
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