Detroit Works Bike-Share Into a Car-Centric City

​One month after launching, Detroit’s new bike-share system is exceeding expectations and has residents and policymakers excited about its future. MoGo isn’t going to be the silver bullet that fixes all of the city’s transportation access problems — what bike-share is? — but the groundwork has been laid for it to be an important piece of the mobility puzzle in this sprawling, 139-square-mile city. Read more... Read more

St. Pete Envisions a Future Free of Traffic Snags

Imagine a city in which bicycles travel from place to place with the same ease as cars and other motorized traffic. That’s the idea behind St. Petersburg’s Complete Streets program. It’s the local edition of a national push by Smart Growth America to make sure everyone – pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders of all ages and abilities – can safely get where they want to go. Read more... Read more

Suburban Sprawl is Out. Smart Growth, Redevelopment, Transit Stations are In

The Census Bureau recently released new municipal population estimates, and the data confirm that a transformation is indeed happening in New Jersey. A number of our urban and built-out municipalities have experienced growth since the recession. Built-out places – which also tend to be the more compact, walkable, and transit-accessible places – have reversed decades of stagnation and sometimes outright population loss, and are now the primary drivers of growth in the post-recession era. Read more... Read more

Bike, Walk and Roll: Minneapolis Expands Bike Lane Network with Eye on Disability Access

Many popular commercial corridors will eventually cede part of the roadway to designated lanes for bicycles. The shift is already fanning the debate about safety, traffic congestion and lost parking in front of shops and homes. But there’s another concern: How can people with disabilities navigate these new streets safely? Read more... Read more

Urban Farms Could Replace Blighted Lots in Cincinnati

Vacant homes and abandoned lots could soon make way for urban farmland under a new pilot being considered by the Cincinnati City Council. Rather than it being a burden on the city to have to pay to maintain vacant spots … give them to somebody that will maintain them and plant some fruits and vegetables. Read more... Read more
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