Bigger Isn’t Always Better: Narrow Traffic Lanes Make Cities Safer

Traffic in Tokyo Reveals Narrow, Safe Traffic Lanes. (Raphael Desrosiers / Flickr)
A long-standing belief among transportation planners and engineers is that wider traffic lanes ensure safe and congestion-free traffic flow. Recent academic research shows that wider lanes are more dangerous than narrower lanes. To further investigate how cities are stacking up against the existing evidence, the Health and Road Safety team of WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities decided to compare typical lane widths in selected global cities with reported traffic fatality rates. Read more... Read more

How Transit Agencies Are Prepping for the Next Big Storm

A Cambridge, Massachusetts, station stands idle last February after a snowstorm shut down the railways. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
Of all the safety risks that could threaten public transportation, a recent survey of transit officials found that after collisions, extreme weather events were their second-highest concern. Conducted by the Center for Urban Transportation Research at the University of South Florida, the survey asked respondents about the most common types of extreme weather their agencies experience, their perception of future risk and how their organizations are preparing and responding to the threat. Read more... Read more

Boston to Test Surge Pricing for Parking Spaces

Boston's Back Bay (Nick S. / Flickr)
In a bid to reduce congestion and move people through downtown more quickly, Boston will test surge pricing for parking. Parking meter prices in Boston were last raised in 2011, and remain much lower than in other major cities at just $1.25 per hour. Starting January 2017, the city will adjust meter rates in the Back Bay and Seaport neighborhoods, charging up to $4 an hour for the most in-demand spots in an attempt to strike the right balance of... Read more

American Society of Adaptation Professionals Prize for Progress

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Have you completed an innovative adaptation project since 2015? Do you have friends or colleagues who deserve recognition for advancing the adaptation field in the last few years? Submit those projects to the American Society of Adaptation Professionals Prize for Progress competition. The purpose of the ASAP Prize for Progress is to improve professional practice in adapting to climate change by highlighting the practices of leading U.S. communities and organizations that have reduced net losses and decreased vulnerability of natural/human... Read more

Communicating Vulnerabilities to Climate Change: Summary Materials from the Climate and Health Assessment

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EPA has developed eight communication kits that summarize key points from The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment for the different populations that are disproportionately affected by climate-change impacts. The agency is providing these materials for use and modification by anyone seeking to communicate the health impacts of climate change to a range of audiences. Access the kits... Read more

14th Annual P3 Awards: A National Student Design Competition for Sustainability Focusing on People, Prosperity and the Planet

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – as part of its People, Prosperity and the Planet (P3) Award Program – is seeking applications proposing to research, develop, and design solutions to real world challenges involving sustainability. The P3 Award Program was developed to foster progress toward sustainability by achieving the mutual goals of improved quality of life, economic prosperity and protection of the planet—people, prosperity, and the planet—the three pillars of sustainability. The EPA offers the P3 competition in order... Read more
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