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Building the Next Generation of National Park Advocates

By Aaron King via ASLA’s The Dirt

Grand Teton National Park (Credit: Flowvella.com)

Grand Teton National Park (Credit: Flowvella.com)

The National Park Service (NPS) will celebrate its centennial on August 25. One hundred years after its creation, the U.S. national park system stands as the “best national park system in the world,” according to National Park Service (NPS) director Jonathan Jarvis, who spoke at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. But he insisted that future success should not be taken for granted.

“Our centennial goal has been to create the next generation of visitors, supporters, and advocates for our national parks and our public lands,” Jarvis said. Failure to do so will result in losing the parks to “selfish interests,” or private development for short-term gain.

One way that Jarvis and the NPS have tried to create this next generation of park enthusiasts is by advertising the parks as part of America’s story.

“When I became director in 2009, we recognized that there were gaps in the American narrative as told by the national parks.” During Jarvis’ tenure, the NPS has taken into its stewardship 22 new sites, including several that speak to the contributions of minorities to America and America’s history of slavery and oppression. The latest place to be designated a national monument is The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, New York City, considered the birthplace of the gay liberation movement.

With a backlog of $12 billion needed for park services and repairs, Jarvis was asked how the NPS considered taking on even more sites into its stewardship.

“In almost every case, we have minimized the actual amount of land or resources we need to take care of, and we have brought in philanthropic partners to assist with that. It does add to our overall responsibility, but I think we’ve been very judicious in ensuring it does not add significantly.”

No one can suggest that the park system has not been successful under Jarvis’ leadership. 2015 saw 312 million people visiting the park system. That is more than the visitors to Disney, the NFL, MLB, NBA, MLS, and NASCAR combined, according to Jarvis.

Still, support for the NPS has been steadily declining in congress. According to the Center for American Progress, members of Congress filed at least 44 bills or amendments that attempted to slash protections for parks and public lands in the last 36 months.

Jarvis said that he and his team are doing their best to partner with corporations and philanthropic bodies to offset certain costs. “The basic operation of a national park is the responsibility of appropriators. Philanthropy gives us that margin of excellence on top of that.”

Jarvis smiled as he waved off suggestions that sponsorship of parks on the part of private partners might lead to signage reading, “The Grand Canyon, brought to you by Exxon.”

“We have always had relations with corporate America. It was the railroads that built most of the major lodges. We are protecting these assets from branding and labeling.”

Asked where he sees the future of the NPS heading, Jarvis reiterated the importance of inspiring a new generation of conservationists and preservationists to “bring the concept of conservation back into their own communities. Many of the initiatives that we have launched, like the studies around the contributions of Latinos and women and Asian American Pacific Islanders, and LGBT community, will be carrying on into the next administration. I don’t see this ending.”

 

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